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Dieting and Restriction isn’t the Answer to Life’s Problems

Health, Lifestyle, Mindset By December 2, 2018 No Comments

A lot of people truly believe that the result of dieting will dramatically change their lives. And if you believe this, it’s not your fault. You’ve been lied to, and I can completely understand why the shiny allure of dieting and restrictive eating is appealing to you.

“Diet and you can be confident.”

“Diet and you can be sexy.”

“Diet and you can be yourself.”

“Diet and you be all the things you can be.” 

But it’s not true. You can do and be all of those things without dieting. Dieting and restriction does damage to your body and your psyche that has severe repercussions.

If you want feel to  confident you don’t have inflict voluntary starvation upon yourself. That won’t change your confidence or happiness levels at all. In fact if you use dieting as tool to try and achieve happiness and confidence, I can promise you that you won’t find those things at the end of the dieting rainbow. I know, because I’ve done it. You may even end up feeling significantly worse if you do decide to go down the path of restriction.

I’ve hungered. I’ve suffered. I’ve punished my body. I ate “clean” and “guilt-free.” All so I could be more confident and like myself. At the end of it all, after achieving the look I wanted, I still had a painfully low level of self-esteem and I was just as sad about my life as I was when I had started. Mental health and self-image need to be addressed directly in order to improve.

Dieting is a distraction that takes your attention away from doing meaningful and joyful things in your life.

If you’re feeling dissatisfied with your life or unhappy, consider reaching out to a mental health professional and seeking help. Dieting, restriction, and thinness won’t lead you to happy ending that you are seeking. Instead of dieting, try doing things that directly make you feel how you want to feel or be how you want to be.

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Unconditional Permission

Health, Lifestyle, Mindset, Nutrition, Uncategorized By November 4, 2018 No Comments

Recovering from dieting and disordered eating behaviours can be difficult. Diet culture is so pervasive in our day to day lives that sometimes we miss the signs that certain behaviours are restrictive and damaging. It can be very easy to become preoccupied with food and start depriving yourself in the name of “health” and end up in psychological and physiological turmoil.

“I really want ice cream but I won’t have it because it’s not healthy.”

“I love chicken wings but I will never eat them because they have too many calories.” 

Lines like these feed into to deprivation – both psychological and physical. Our body and brain send us signals to tell us when to eat and what to eat. Whenever we don’t eat what our body is telling us it needs we are depriving ourselves of nutrients and energy that we need for survival and also just general enjoyment.

It’s in these moments when our body is telling us what it needs that we must listen to it and trust it. This means giving yourself unconditional permission to eat. Giving yourself permissions to eat what you want, when you want it. This will allow you to discover and enjoy foods while also staving off cravings (which can prevent things like binge eating. ) Eating with unconditional permission will satisfy your hunger and cravings while making your food experiences more meaningful and enjoyable.

Unconditional permission give your body what it needs, let’s you build trust with your body and let go of damaging food rules that keep you from food freedom. No foods are off-limits (unless you have allergies or other medical reasons to not consume certain foods.) If you want eggs, bacon, and avocado for breakfast, have it. If your hunger is telling you to eat pizza for dinner, do it.  If you want midday pancakes, listen to your body and eat. You will also probably eventually find yourself craving things like apples, salad, watermelon, yogurt too once you allow yourself to have some food freedom.

In addition to allowing your body to have a variety of foods, you are also less likely to overeat when you are actually eating and savouring the foods that you really want to eat. There is a switch in your brain that goes on when you realize you can eat what you want, whenever you want it, in quantities that are congruent to your hunger. The following examples will illustrate the difference between dieting and eating with unconditional permission.

DIETING: ” I want a brownie, but I can’t have it because it’s not allowed on my diet. I am going to eat three cups of cooked broccoli so I’m too full to eat a brownie. I ate three cups of broccoli but I still want the brownie. I now ‘give in’ because I am deprived, and instead of eating one brownie I eat a whole batch. I then swear to never eat brownies again in my life because I am now uncomfortably full and ashamed.” Repeat cycle.

UNCONDITIONAL PERMISSION: ” I want a brownie. I eat a brownie to satisfaction. I move on with my life.”

The diet mentality is painful, restrictive, and stressful. Giving yourself unconditional permission to honour your body and hunger is simple, and it gets easier and better with practice.

Your relationship with food does not need to be complicated and painful. You are allowed to eat free of restriction, stress, and guilt. You are allowed to the foods that you want, when you want them. You can trust your body. You can nourish your body. You can give yourself unconditional permission to eat. 

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The Best Workout Routine

exercise, Health, Lifestyle, Programming By August 19, 2018 No Comments

**Spoiler Alert: There is no specific training program attached to this article, rather guidelines for creating or picking a long-term and sustainable exercise program for yourself.**

Many people start new workout routines all the time with the intention of becoming healthier and more “fit.” Sadly a lot of people struggle to maintain these routines due to the fact that the programs they are following are not sustainable nor enjoyable. It is immensely difficult to create sustainable long-term habit change when those changes are focused on engaging in habits that 1) you hate doing, 2) burn you out.

So how do you create an exercise routine that serves you best?

You would want to look at several factors when creating an exercise and activity routine (that are not limited to): frequency, duration, and qualitative factors that you enjoy but also keep you motivated.

Frequency & Duration

When choosing your frequency and duration you want to factor in your general lifestyle, schedule, stress levels, and ability to recover. People who have low levels of stress will be able to recover more quickly and will often times do better training and exercising more often (3-7 days per week.) While people who have high levels of stress or anxiety will recover more slowly and will need to train less frequently (1-5 days per week.)

Knowing this you’d also want to keep the duration of your exercise in line with your training frequency and ability to recover. Generally, the more often you train the shorter in duration your workouts should be, and the less often you train the longer in duration your workouts should be. A workout or bout of exercise could range anywhere from 30 minutes to 90 minutes.

Qualities

When looking at different qualities a training program or activity has, different people will naturally be drawn to different types of activities. Some people like high intensity training, some people prefer activities that are more soothing, some people like working in groups, while others prefer doing their exercise alone. Whatever floats your boat, at the end of the day it’s about finding what works for you and keeps you consistent and motivated.

Typically people are drawn to at least one of these five qualities:

  1. Intensity: Activities that are maximal effort, neurologically demanding, require brute force, and often times are more aggressive in nature. These activities can include boxing, powerlifting, rugby, olympic lifting.
  2. Explosiveness: Activities that are neurologically demanding, requiring explosive efforts and high levels of power but also coordination  such as sprinting, jumping, olympic lifting, gymnastics, etc.
  3. Variety: Activities that are varied and satisfy the need to learn new skills without getting bored. Exercise needs to be both neurologically and muscularly demanding. Essentially every type of exercise can be enjoyable and will deliver progressive results. Anything will work but only for a while. A very popular activity in this category would be CrossFit.
  4. Sensation: Activities that allow you to create a strong mind-muscle connection and pay attention to how the body feels. This includes but is not limited to activities such as bodybuilding and yoga. These activities are muscularly demanding.
  5. Precision: Activities that are demanding on the muscular system but require structure and constant repetitive mastery of a skill such as distance running, grappling,  and bodybuilding. The repetitive movement patterns often have a calming effect.

 NOTE: These categories are from Christian Thibaudeau’s Neurotying which is based in research surrounding individual sensitivity to neurotransmitters (dopamine, adrenalin, and serotonin) and other factors like (Acetylcholine and GABA.) I highly recommend getting more information, starting here.

The idea behind picking activities to do that you are more drawn to is that because you enjoy what you are doing you will be able to push yourself harder, get results, and stay consistent – making your exercise routine sustainable. This will allow you to express yourself physically in the way that is best suited to your individual needs and desires. Who doesn’t want more of that?

When you love what you do, and it suits your needs and lifestyle, what reason do you have to not part-take in physical activity? 

I firmly believe there is an activity or training program out there for everybody, you just need to find what works for you and respect that.

 

 

 

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Intuitive Eating: What is it and how can you start doing it?

Health, Lifestyle, Mindset, Nutrition By February 20, 2018 Tags: , , , No Comments

“For both excessive and insufficient exercise destroy one’s strength, and both eating and drinking too much or too little destroy health, whereas the right quantity produces, increases or preserves it.” – Aristotle

If you are someone who has been trying to get off the diet-binge hamster wheel and make peace with your body and food, you’ve probably heard of Intuitive Eating.

Upon quick investigation, intuitive eating sounds to good to be true – it boasts that you can make peace with your body, make peace with food, maintain a healthy body weight, all while eating what you want when you want. However it is not too good to be true, and it does exactly what it says. What’s not to love about that?

Intuitive eating relies on using our natural bodily senses that we have had since birth. We listen to our bodies’ signals to eat when we are hungry and stop when we are not. It allows us to honour all our physiological, emotional, and social needs that food satisfies in our life without overly restricting and depriving ourselves of food.

Intuitive eating gives us the balance that allows us to respect that sometimes our bodies need a delicious brownie and sometimes our bodies also need salmon and spinach to nourish us. It rids us of harsh food dichotomies that are damaging to our overall well-being.

Intuitive eating respects that our bodies’ weight will fluctuate and adapt depending on a variety of lifestyle factors that affect our metabolisms. Our bodies deserve nourishment and respect regardless of their shape or size – sometimes we need more food and sometimes we need less. Similarly, sometimes our bodies need to store fat and sometimes they do not, and that is perfectly okay. Learning how to trust your body can be scary, but it’s a very important part of ending the cycle of being a yo-yo dieter.

Gaining weight after ending a strict diet and returning to normal intuitive eating is a perfectly normal and healthy response for a body that has been starving and deprived. Conversely for someone who has been ignoring their satiety cues it is not uncommon to lose weight once they start eating intuitively. In each scenario, our bodies are doing exactly what they need to be doing to preserve our health.

Our bodies tell us what we need and give us exactly what we need, we just need to make sure we listen to it. And no one will ever be perfect at intuitive eating, but just being “a little bit better” is the perfect place to start.

WHERE TO START

When you start eating intuitively, we first want to look at our bodily signals: hunger and satiety.

HUNGER: Hunger is our body’s signal that we need nourishment. We may feel empty, we may experience hunger pangs, we may get lightheaded, and even nauseous in cases of extreme hunger.

SATIETY: Satiety is our body’s signal that we have been nourished and can stop eating. You may experience a lack of interest in food, a loss of hunger, a feeling of fullness. In some cases we may be overly satiated and feel very full and uncomfortable.

Hunger and Satiety exists together on spectrum of varying degrees. How different levels of hunger and satiety feels will vary from person to person. It’s valuable exercises to use a number scale (most commonly zero to ten to grade your hunger.)

For example my hunger-satiety scale looks something like this:

– So hungry I feel nauseous and have a severe headache.

1 to 2 – So hungry I could eat the bark off of a tree, I am also moody and irritable.

– I need to eat very soon, I may reach for any food that is available even if it’s something I do not want.

– I am hungry and my appetite is telling me that I need to, but my hunger is not uncomfortable.

– I am neither hungry nor full, I feel neutral. I am not thing about food.

– I have eaten but I am not fully satiated, if I were going to sleep I would need a little more food or I will wake up at night with hunger pangs throughout the night.

7 to 8 – I feel well satiated, I am not uncomfortable after eating and stopping at this stage. I should not need to eat for a few hours. I could part-take in light exercise or activity after eating.

– I have eaten a little too much. I may be a little bit bloated and feel slightly uncomfortable.

10 – I have eaten way too much, I am largely bloated. My stomach hurts, I may need to lay down. I might feel sleepy from eating too much. I usually don’t want to see or smell food at this point.

Understanding and respecting your hunger and satiety cues is one of the principle foundations of intuitive eating. In order to properly be able to listen to our bodies’ cues, this means that we need to eat slowly enough for our brain to process the information our digestive system is sending to it.

It typically takes our brain 20 minutes to catch up with what is going on in our stomach. If you’re someone who eats very quickly (I know I am!) –  it may be a good exercise to try timing how long it takes you to eat. For some people even taking 10 minutes to eat a meal may be a feat, and that’s okay. There are plenty of ways to train yourself to slow down the pace of your meals. You could:

  • put your utensils down in between bites
  • chew your food thoroughly (this is good for your digestion and also the reason why our mouths have teeth 😉 )
  • share a meal with friends and family and engage in social behaviour
  • eat with your non-dominant hand or utensil you are not accustomed to (chop stick, etc.)
  • set time aside (20-30min +)  to eat your meals so you are not rushed

It may not be easy to develop the habit of slowing down and paying attention to your body’s cues, especially if you’ve been ignoring them and behaving according to external cues (i.e., I am on “x” diet, so I can only eat “y” type/amount of food – even I am hungry/overfull) for a significant amount of time. However, it is an integral part of healing your relationship with your body and with food. Starting with eating slowly and learning how to interpret your hunger and satiety signals is a great place to start.

If you want to further deeply explore the principles of Intuitive Eating and practice it daily in your day to day life you should read the 10 Principles of Intuitive Eating by Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch.

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Losing Weight Does Not Cure Negative Body Image.

Fat Loss, Health, Lifestyle, Mindset By March 26, 2017 Tags: , , , , , No Comments

 

This is typically something you will not hear from someone who works in my field. Personal trainers have been profitting off of the negative self-image of others for a long time. Promising that when you lose 20lbs or you have a more shapely butt that you will just start to ooze confidence.

Unfortunately, a change in the number on the scale is unlikely to unravel your whole self-belief system you have held for the majority of your life. If you view your body negatively, the way you see yourself is not going to change just because you lose weight. The way you carry yourself is not going to change just because you lose weight.

As someone whose weight has varied from its heaviest at 220lbs and at its lightest 135lbs, I can tell you that even at the times in my life when I was my leanest I was never satisfied with how my body looked. I was in what a lot of people consider to be “great shape” and still I had no confidence – I was painfully shy and the idea of wearing shorts in public would send me into a frenzy of tears and panic. I would constantly compare myself to other women – especially models and actresses – and try to validate myself by making my body and my overall look similar to them.

Nowadays, I maintain a fairly consistent bodyweight, and although I am not at my leanest – I am probably the healthiest I have ever been mentally and physically. I am strong and mobile and I can do things I was not even able to do as a child – such as handbalancing. I now maintain eye contact with people when I am talking to them, I don’t speak quietly or mumble anymore, and I am no longer petrified of wearing shorts in public. And even though I am not what society considers traditionally beautiful – I am happy with my body: how it looks and all the wonderful things it does. And this confidence has trickled into all aspects of my life.

But I know not everyone feels this way about their bodies. We have it hard, as women society tells us that if we are not “conventionally beautiful” à la Victoria Secret Angel than we are not valued. By no means am I saying that looking like a supermodel is wrong, however there are maybe 5 people in the world that look like Victoria Secret Angels and there are 3.5 billion women being told to look like that and being told that they are not worthy or valued based on how they look right now. And this is a HUGE PROBLEM.

There are 5 women in the world that look like this and it shouldn’t matter that you don’t look like them.

We, the people, come in a variety of shapes, colours, sizes, ages, ability, and body compositions and we should never feel guilty or ashamed of being ourselves nor for simply being in our bodies. The sooner we acknowledge and accept that, the sooner we can heal our broken relationships with our bodies and develop a stronger and more positive self-image. We can ask for better representation of our diverse bodies by voting with our dollars with the products purchase, by purchasing from companies that showcase our diversity. Hopefully over time we will achieve better representation of our physical diversity and this will normalize all bodies.

There is a strong need for a more diverse range of people in our modern day media.

Outside of asking society to change the narrow representation of the female body there are things we can do ourselves. We must first start by accepting our bodies and loving them. We can do this by:

  • doing things that make our bodies feel good; moving, eating, resting, sleeping, laughing, dancing, singing, exercising in ways that we enjoy, etc.
  • wearing clothing that is comfortable and makes us feel good
  • surrounding ourselves with positive people
  • keeping an inventory of the things we like about ourselves and our bodies
  • being grateful for all the wonderful things our bodies can do such as breathing, healing, running, etc.
  • protesting messages and media that are non-inclusive with regards to our bodies
  • calling people out for body policing and shutting down body policing

I also strongly believe an integral part of developing healthy body-image also begins by detaching our value as human beings to our looks. I am not saying it is wrong to want to change the way you look – however knowing that are valued outside of your looks is highly important. We are whole people – with skills, abilities, and smarts that can contribute to the world in so many positive ways outside of our looks. Taking the time to acknowledge, develop, and use our non-aesthetic assets will allow you to positively impact the world and in turn reward us with confidence and happiness that conforming our bodies to a societal iron maiden never could. 

When we start to claim our presence as whole people, we remember that we are not hollow shells meant earn our place in the world by pleasing the eyes of others. Only once we have accepted our bodies as they are can we begin to love them and act from a place of compassion and treat ourselves with respect and love we deseve. Maybe then we will fully acknowledge that losing weight does not cure negative body image.

Our remedy for negative body image starts with how we think and how we act. We need to act in line with how we want to feel and stand together to manifest the changes necessary to make us feel more positively about our bodies. We owe it to ourselves to take the steps towards feeling comfortable, safe, and confident in our bodies, and we are the only people who can make that happen.

I know I am ready for women to feel normal, happy, confident, and proud of their bodies. 

Are you?

 

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The World Needs the Body Positivity Movement

Health, Lifestyle, Mindset By February 5, 2017 Tags: , , , No Comments

As some of you may or may not know, I often describe myself as “body positive.”

Some people adore this, some people are confused by it, and some people find it down right offensive. For the last two, it’s mostly because people don’t understand what “body positivity” is and why it is.

 

“Isn’t body positivity just and excuse to be lazy and eat ice cream all day?”

I truly wish I had a dollar every time someone asked me if body positivity is just an excuse to be lazy and not take action towards living a healthy lifestyle. That is actually the antithesis of body positivity.

Body positivity is learning to appreciate all the different facets of your body in relation to form and function so we can feel good about the bodies we have and lead happier, more confident, and more productive lives. People who feel positively about their bodies will respect the bodies – and this will be reflected in their actions. People who love and respect the bodies will nourish themselves, move and exercise to feel good, rest and recover, and engage in self-care that sets them up for a life where they thrive physically and spiritually.

Conversely, when we hold negative views about ourselves and our bodies, the actions we take are often out of self-hatred and we end up abusing our bodies. As I’ve observed many times and have part-taken in during various times in my life, people abuse their bodies in a multitude of ways every single day and these behaviours are reflected on a spectrum of extremes:

  • eating foods that make them feel terrible
  • over eating
  • under eating
  • restrictive dieting
  • disordered eating patterns
  • substance abuse
  • over exercising
  • not exercising
  • not resting and recovery
  • conforming their body into an iron maiden of societal beauty standards
  • and much more…

“All you see is what you lacking, not what you packing.” – J. Cole

The by-product of this negativity we feel towards ourselves when we are not body positive is also reflected in how we treat other people. “We see the world not as it is, but as we are,” – if we are constantly criticizing ourselves, hating ourselves, and forcing ourselves into suffering we are incapable of feeling positively and feeling supportive of the people around us.

And this feeling is something that exists in people of all sizes and shapes – recall that body shame exists on a spectrum of extremes and these behaviours are exhibited in many different ways. This is why “fat-shaming” and “fit-shaming” are things, because people are so critical of themselves and suffering so much that they feel the need to shame others – misery loves company – so then there is this attitude that “If I have to suffer, you have to suffer with me.”

But the world doesn’t have to be this way. This spectrum of body-shaming wouldn’t exist if people took time to dismantle the negative thoughts and behaviours that keep them stuck in the same place. Evidently, there are a lot of external factors in our society we can’t control. However we can focus on the things we can control – the internal factors: how we think and behave towards ourselves and others.

It won’t be an overnight turn-around, but one day at a time, one action a time, we can change ourselves and the world around us. It starts within, changing our negative self-talk, being more compassionate to ourselves, and being less critical. Once we start taking better care of ourselves, we can evolve to a point where we are able to be kind and supportive to others – making our lives and the world we live in significantly better.

Are you ready to join the movement?

 

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3 Tips for Mindful Eating

Fat Loss, Health, Lifestyle, Mindset, Nutrition By November 25, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , No Comments

“Everything moderation,” they say.

You know who I am talking about, your friends whole effortlessly lean and radiant, yet eat whatever they want. Small pieces of chocolate every day, pasta at dinner, the occasional decadent hot chocolate with whipped cream and full-fat milk. They’re never uncomfortable after eating. Their weight isn’t jumping around by 20lbs multiples times per year.

Meanwhile, you gain 10lbs just by looks at a piece of double chocolate cheesecake. You’ve been gluten-free, low-carb, calorie tracking, macrocounting dieting for God knows how long.  Eating 1400 calories religiously daily during the week, only to find yourself 10,000 calories deep into a large pizza on Friday night continuing on glutinnously raging through the weekend.

Trapping yourself in the cycle of restrict and deprive, and then bingeing as a “reward” or “treat.” Losing weight every week, gaining back the same weight every weekend, and losing that same weight again next week – punishing yourself with food restriction and excessive exercise to make up for the lack of “progress.”

The physical and psychological torments we put ourselves can be mind boggling. Clearly it’s not working. So why do we do it? Sometimes because we don’t know any better.

There is better. And we can do better. 

I want to talk to you about Mindful Eating.

Mindful eating isn’t some crazy “woo woo” trend you need to go to the Himalayas and train with the Dalai Lama to learn. In fact it’s quite simple and quite easy. You don’t need to count your calories, you don’t need to deprive yourself, and you don’t need to eliminate all the foods you love that been called “bad” by zealots who want you to believe that certain foods are holier than thou.

Mindful eating is done simply by paying attention to all the things that are happening while you are eating. Eating slowly and paying attention the sensantions, flavours, textures, and feelings that are experienced while eating your meals.

Because of the enhanced awareness we have while eating mindfully, most people who practice this are able to maintain healthy body composition while still being able to enjoy all of their favourite foods. When we slow down and focus on really experiencing our food we autoregulate our caloric-intake. This allows most people to avoid eating themselves to a point of discomfort, being overful, and taking in excess calories.

So how can you start eating mindfully? Start with these three steps.

  1. Put your phone down
    • In the words of the ever-mighty Erykah Badu: “I can make you put your phone down.” Maybe the phone isn’t your vice, but you want to avoid any distractions while you are eating your meals. Turn off the TV, put your phone down, and give your meal the undivided attention it deserves.  Being distracted while eating will take away from being able to pay attention to what is actually happening in your body. Are you hungry? Are you full? Does your food even taste good?
  2. Eat slowly
    • Next, you will want to make sure you are eating slowly. A lot of people are not even aware of how quickly they are eating. People who eat slowly tend lose and maintain weight more easily, and have better digestion, than people who do not eat slowly. You’re body physically needs time figure out when it satisfied (not full,) and eating slowly will ensure that you don’t jump the gun overeat unecessarily. The improved digestion will mainly start from taking time to properly chew your food better instead of taking larger bites and swallowing the food in large chunks, meaning your digestive system doesn’t have to work as hard to break down and process the nutrients that you are taking in. A good goal for a window of time to eat meals would be 20-30 minutes. If setting aside a half hour for a meal feels like an eternity, set a timer for 15 minutes and see if you can gradually eat a little bit slower each week.
  3. Taste your food
    • Start making mental notes about what your food actually tastes like and how you are experiencing it. Is the texture soft, chewy, crunchy, tough? How does your food taste? Sweet, savoury, salty, sour, bitter? How does your food smell? How do you physically feel while eating your food? Do you enjoy it? How could you improve it? How do you feel mentally while eating your food? Is it satisfying? These are all important things to pay attention while eating. And will allow you to truly experience your food and enjoy it significantly more.

 

So there you have it, eat what you want, but do it slowly, and savour the moment. 😉

Be like Erykah Badu, and put your phone down.

 

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Life is a dream, and I dream lucid. 

Lifestyle, Mindset By August 20, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , , , , No Comments

There is no such thing as too much ambition. 

Small minds will tell you that there is. But there isn’t.

Greatness was never achieved by thinking small or doubting your abilities. Maybe I am overly confident in myself, but I doubt it. 

 This morning, I was having a conversation with my colleague about how I don’t have a fear of losing my job – not because I think it would be impossible for me to lose my job – but even if I did, I have the utmost belief that no matter what life throws at me I can’t be broken and I will always be okay.

Yes – I can fail, repeatedly. I can be hurt. These things happen while living a full life but these are parts of the journey, not the end of it. And it’s because of these beliefs and understandings that I don’t think there’s such a thing as being too ambitious. I recognize that life is a dream, and I dream lucid. 

My first year of college in my Intro to Psych course my professor wrote a message for our class to read: “Positive mental attitude + Goals = Success.”  This message has never served me wrong.

If you believe in yourself, your mission, and you have the tenacity of a honey badger – you can’t be stopped. 

When people tell you that your goals and dreams are too lofty, remember: no one ever broke new ground or did anything epic by thinking “Let’s be realistic,” or by self-imposing limitations. 

May your dreams and aspirations be larger than life, and may you be tenacious in achieving them. 

 

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Ditch Your Food Scales: The Hand Guide for a Balanced Diet

Lifestyle, Nutrition By February 23, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , No Comments

Can you recite the caloric value and macronutrient content of canned tuna, chicken, cucumber, tomatoes, apples, and peanut butter like it’s your job? Have you ever had a panic attack while trying to weigh your food to make sure you ate x amount kCals per day?

While tracking caloric and macronutrient intake can be useful over short periods of times – when done for extended periods of time it can warp your psyche. Especially if you lean towards the Type A perfectionist side of things (many of us do, myself included.) While results from adhering to an extremely strict dietary protocol can feel rewarding, it’s the same strict protocols that limit us in our ability to makes choices that serve us better overall and exercise our personal power.

There is a loss of power and choice when you follow a restrictive diet and don’t get to be proactive in choosing what and when you eat based off of your hunger, satiety, and needs. As a living organism with daily fluctuations in energy use and needs and no amount of macronutrient or calorie tracking is going to be able adapt to that.

Luckily we have a built in system in our body that takes care of these daily fluctuations of by regulating our appetite and satiety – and the more you pay attention to these signals the easier it gets. But to get good at listening to your body’s signal that also means you have:

  1. Stop neglecting hunger; no dieting or excessive restricion of food intakes
  2. Stop neglecting satiety; eating slowly untill you are satisfied but not ready to burst

You can be strong, healthy, thriving and sane without having the additional stress of counting calories or macronutrients. Your eating strategies need to work for you – not the other way around. You are not bound my chains to your food scale or your diet. Gone are the days of trying to figure out how many Oreos you can eat so you don’t blow your diet. If you’re ready to be free of obsessive food tracking, calorie counting, and restriction but don’t know where to start – read on.

If you’ve ever sat over your kitchen counter in front of scale with you a piece of paper, pen, calculator and tears in your eyes – this guide is for you. 


The Hand Guide for a Balanced Diet

The following guide will help outline what foods you should be adding in to your diet on a daily basis and what types of quantities. It is not a rigid restrictive guideline and is flexible system that is inclusive off mostly whole foods that will help you achieve a balanced diet so you can feel great, look great, and thrive. We’re going to to go over the food groups, meal structure, and portion sizes so you’ll be good to go using your most handy and convenient measuring tool – your hand. On ward to a simple, effective, and stress-free dietary system.

Food Groups 

Protein dense foods

Provides us with amino acids to help maintain and rebuild tissues in the body.

Chicken, beef, eggs, turkey, salmon, tuna, Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, protein powders, etc.

Vegetables & Fruits (Fibrous foods)

Provides us with fibre for optimal digestive health as well as being a significant source or micronutrients needed for various chemical processes in the body.

Spinach, peppers, apples, bananas, carrots, cauliflower, broccoli, tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini, squash, berries, etc.

Carbohydrate dense foods

Provides us with a direct source of energy for brain function and physical activity.

Rice, quinoa, couscous, oats, noodles, breads, etc.

Fat dense foods

Important for maintaing cellular health and strucutre as well as synthetiszing hormones in the body.

Olive oil, butter,  coconut oil, avocado, cream, nuts, nut butters, seeds, dressings, etc.

Meal Structure

In terms of structuring your meals you want to aim to have a balanced plate each time you eat – this means including good sources of protein, fibre, carbohydrate, and fats at each meal. This means adding 1-2 servings of each food category to each meal, this structure is based off of eating 3 – 4 meals per day.

Depending on your size and activity level you may need more food than what is suggested, start with the guideline as a basis and as you get more comfortable feel free to add as you need to based off your levels of hunger and satiety.

  Female Male
Protein Dense Foods 1 serving per meal 2 servings per meal
Vegetables & Fruits (Fibrous foods) 1 serving per meal 2 servings per meal
Carbohydrate dense foods 1 serving per meal 2 servings per meal
Fat dense foods 1 serving per meal 2 servings per meal

Portions

Last but not least we’re finally at the part where you can throw out your food scale and measuring cup. Your new measuring tool is your lovely hand. The great thing about your hand is that you always have it and can bring it anywhere you go. Secondly, it’s already proportionate to you – meaning if you’re a big person, you have a bigger hand or if you’re a smaller person, you have a smaller hand. It’s hard to go wrong 😉

 

Serving Size

Protein Dense Foods

The size of your palm

Vegetables & Fruits (Fibrous foods)

The size of your fist

Carbohydrate dense foods

The size of a cupped hand

Fat dense foods

The size of your thumb

 

IMG_6754

Refer to this super high tech visual guide.


I know what you’re probably thinking: “That’s all?!” like 90% of the people I’ve ever taught this system.

To which I answer: Yes, that is all. I want you to eat your proteins, your vegetables, your carbs, and your fats. I want you to feel and look great. I want you to have as little stress as possible when it comes to having a healthy balanced diet filled with foods that you love. And most importantly I want you to enjoy the process of eating well and I want you to enjoy the food.

By keeping it simple with this guide, you’re well on your way to feeling great and living your healthiest life both physically and mentally. And if you really want an Oreo at the end of the day after you’ve nourished your body with all these awesome foods – go for it 😉

Are you ready to use the Hand Guide? Are you already using the Hand Guide?

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Daily Dose of Hustle

Lifestyle, Mindset By January 31, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , No Comments

“Success is the sum of small efforts – repeated day in and day out.” – Robert Collier

I guarantee this is something everyone of us has heard at least once in our lifetime. In fact, you’ve probably even lived it if you’ve ever had to work in order to succeed at something.

Who comes to mind when you think of success or greatness? I think of Beyonce, Oprah, Michael Jordan, Muhammad Ali, Bruce Lee, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs. Some of the things these people have achieved are remarkable and may even seem almost unrealistic or unattainable for lots of people to replicate in their own lives. Arguably people could say it would be impossible to achieve as much success as these people – but that’s self-defeating mindset, and that’s not what we’re about.

beyonce

And by no means I am going to imply I expect you to be the next Oprah, but I do wholeheartedly believe that if there is something you want to achieve in regards to your physique, your health, your strength, your career, your life, you should pursue it with a relentless and consistent effort such as the Beyonces, Oprahs, and Michael Jordans of the world.

If there’s something you really want, and I don’t mean “kind of want”…I mean you want it so badly you’ll do what it actually to get it – you should take a step each day that brings you closer to your goal. 

But you can’t just say “I’m gonna do something every day to make it happen.” That’s a sweet intention with good enthusiasm – but you need to take it one step further. You need to plan ahead. You need to plan your actions. Your actions are the biggest indicator of whether or not you will fail or succeed in achieving what you want.

Actionable planning can be simple. In fact the simpler it is, the better. What I’m working on for the next six weeks is weight training four times per week for 45-60 minutes and doing aerobic cardiovascular training seven times per week for 20 minutes. If you were to look into my monthly day planner right now, I can show you exactly where my training time slots are for each workout and where I intend to do them. It’s a very simple and specific plan and undoubtedly a good way to get my achieve what I want. Not only is it easy to adhere to, but I’m creating a plan to forge habits that will allow me to live my life in a way that I want. 

By living in a way that is consistent with our desires we bring our dreams to life. That is how we achieve success. And quite honestly, that’s completely worth a daily dose of hustle.  What do you need to do to live the life that you want?

 “Your beliefs become your thoughts. Your thoughts become your words. Your words become your actions. Your actions become your habits. Your habits become your destiny.” – Mahatma Ghandi

Did this post make or break your day? I wanna hear from your. Leave your thoughts and questions in the comment section 🙂

xoxo

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