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Intuitive Eating: What is it and how can you start doing it?

Health, Lifestyle, Mindset, Nutrition By February 20, 2018 Tags: , , , No Comments

“For both excessive and insufficient exercise destroy one’s strength, and both eating and drinking too much or too little destroy health, whereas the right quantity produces, increases or preserves it.” – Aristotle

If you are someone who has been trying to get off the diet-binge hamster wheel and make peace with your body and food, you’ve probably heard of Intuitive Eating.

Upon quick investigation, intuitive eating sounds to good to be true – it boasts that you can make peace with your body, make peace with food, maintain a healthy body weight, all while eating what you want when you want. However it is not too good to be true, and it does exactly what it says. What’s not to love about that?

Intuitive eating relies on using our natural bodily senses that we have had since birth. We listen to our bodies’ signals to eat when we are hungry and stop when we are not. It allows us to honour all our physiological, emotional, and social needs that food satisfies in our life without overly restricting and depriving ourselves of food.

Intuitive eating gives us the balance that allows us to respect that sometimes our bodies need a delicious brownie and sometimes our bodies also need salmon and spinach to nourish us. It rids us of harsh food dichotomies that are damaging to our overall well-being.

Intuitive eating respects that our bodies’ weight will fluctuate and adapt depending on a variety of lifestyle factors that affect our metabolisms. Our bodies deserve nourishment and respect regardless of their shape or size – sometimes we need more food and sometimes we need less. Similarly, sometimes our bodies need to store fat and sometimes they do not, and that is perfectly okay. Learning how to trust your body can be scary, but it’s a very important part of ending the cycle of being a yo-yo dieter.

Gaining weight after ending a strict diet and returning to normal intuitive eating is a perfectly normal and healthy response for a body that has been starving and deprived. Conversely for someone who has been ignoring their satiety cues it is not uncommon to lose weight once they start eating intuitively. In each scenario, our bodies are doing exactly what they need to be doing to preserve our health.

Our bodies tell us what we need and give us exactly what we need, we just need to make sure we listen to it. And no one will ever be perfect at intuitive eating, but just being “a little bit better” is the perfect place to start.

WHERE TO START

When you start eating intuitively, we first want to look at our bodily signals: hunger and satiety.

HUNGER: Hunger is our body’s signal that we need nourishment. We may feel empty, we may experience hunger pangs, we may get lightheaded, and even nauseous in cases of extreme hunger.

SATIETY: Satiety is our body’s signal that we have been nourished and can stop eating. You may experience a lack of interest in food, a loss of hunger, a feeling of fullness. In some cases we may be overly satiated and feel very full and uncomfortable.

Hunger and Satiety exists together on spectrum of varying degrees. How different levels of hunger and satiety feels will vary from person to person. It’s valuable exercises to use a number scale (most commonly zero to ten to grade your hunger.)

For example my hunger-satiety scale looks something like this:

– So hungry I feel nauseous and have a severe headache.

1 to 2 – So hungry I could eat the bark off of a tree, I am also moody and irritable.

– I need to eat very soon, I may reach for any food that is available even if it’s something I do not want.

– I am hungry and my appetite is telling me that I need to, but my hunger is not uncomfortable.

– I am neither hungry nor full, I feel neutral. I am not thing about food.

– I have eaten but I am not fully satiated, if I were going to sleep I would need a little more food or I will wake up at night with hunger pangs throughout the night.

7 to 8 – I feel well satiated, I am not uncomfortable after eating and stopping at this stage. I should not need to eat for a few hours. I could part-take in light exercise or activity after eating.

– I have eaten a little too much. I may be a little bit bloated and feel slightly uncomfortable.

10 – I have eaten way too much, I am largely bloated. My stomach hurts, I may need to lay down. I might feel sleepy from eating too much. I usually don’t want to see or smell food at this point.

Understanding and respecting your hunger and satiety cues is one of the principle foundations of intuitive eating. In order to properly be able to listen to our bodies’ cues, this means that we need to eat slowly enough for our brain to process the information our digestive system is sending to it.

It typically takes our brain 20 minutes to catch up with what is going on in our stomach. If you’re someone who eats very quickly (I know I am!) –  it may be a good exercise to try timing how long it takes you to eat. For some people even taking 10 minutes to eat a meal may be a feat, and that’s okay. There are plenty of ways to train yourself to slow down the pace of your meals. You could:

  • put your utensils down in between bites
  • chew your food thoroughly (this is good for your digestion and also the reason why our mouths have teeth 😉 )
  • share a meal with friends and family and engage in social behaviour
  • eat with your non-dominant hand or utensil you are not accustomed to (chop stick, etc.)
  • set time aside (20-30min +)  to eat your meals so you are not rushed

It may not be easy to develop the habit of slowing down and paying attention to your body’s cues, especially if you’ve been ignoring them and behaving according to external cues (i.e., I am on “x” diet, so I can only eat “y” type/amount of food – even I am hungry/overfull) for a significant amount of time. However, it is an integral part of healing your relationship with your body and with food. Starting with eating slowly and learning how to interpret your hunger and satiety signals is a great place to start.

If you want to further deeply explore the principles of Intuitive Eating and practice it daily in your day to day life you should read the 10 Principles of Intuitive Eating by Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch.

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3 Tips for Mindful Eating

Fat Loss, Health, Lifestyle, Mindset, Nutrition By November 25, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , No Comments

“Everything moderation,” they say.

You know who I am talking about, your friends whole effortlessly lean and radiant, yet eat whatever they want. Small pieces of chocolate every day, pasta at dinner, the occasional decadent hot chocolate with whipped cream and full-fat milk. They’re never uncomfortable after eating. Their weight isn’t jumping around by 20lbs multiples times per year.

Meanwhile, you gain 10lbs just by looks at a piece of double chocolate cheesecake. You’ve been gluten-free, low-carb, calorie tracking, macrocounting dieting for God knows how long.  Eating 1400 calories religiously daily during the week, only to find yourself 10,000 calories deep into a large pizza on Friday night continuing on glutinnously raging through the weekend.

Trapping yourself in the cycle of restrict and deprive, and then bingeing as a “reward” or “treat.” Losing weight every week, gaining back the same weight every weekend, and losing that same weight again next week – punishing yourself with food restriction and excessive exercise to make up for the lack of “progress.”

The physical and psychological torments we put ourselves can be mind boggling. Clearly it’s not working. So why do we do it? Sometimes because we don’t know any better.

There is better. And we can do better. 

I want to talk to you about Mindful Eating.

Mindful eating isn’t some crazy “woo woo” trend you need to go to the Himalayas and train with the Dalai Lama to learn. In fact it’s quite simple and quite easy. You don’t need to count your calories, you don’t need to deprive yourself, and you don’t need to eliminate all the foods you love that been called “bad” by zealots who want you to believe that certain foods are holier than thou.

Mindful eating is done simply by paying attention to all the things that are happening while you are eating. Eating slowly and paying attention the sensantions, flavours, textures, and feelings that are experienced while eating your meals.

Because of the enhanced awareness we have while eating mindfully, most people who practice this are able to maintain healthy body composition while still being able to enjoy all of their favourite foods. When we slow down and focus on really experiencing our food we autoregulate our caloric-intake. This allows most people to avoid eating themselves to a point of discomfort, being overful, and taking in excess calories.

So how can you start eating mindfully? Start with these three steps.

  1. Put your phone down
    • In the words of the ever-mighty Erykah Badu: “I can make you put your phone down.” Maybe the phone isn’t your vice, but you want to avoid any distractions while you are eating your meals. Turn off the TV, put your phone down, and give your meal the undivided attention it deserves.  Being distracted while eating will take away from being able to pay attention to what is actually happening in your body. Are you hungry? Are you full? Does your food even taste good?
  2. Eat slowly
    • Next, you will want to make sure you are eating slowly. A lot of people are not even aware of how quickly they are eating. People who eat slowly tend lose and maintain weight more easily, and have better digestion, than people who do not eat slowly. You’re body physically needs time figure out when it satisfied (not full,) and eating slowly will ensure that you don’t jump the gun overeat unecessarily. The improved digestion will mainly start from taking time to properly chew your food better instead of taking larger bites and swallowing the food in large chunks, meaning your digestive system doesn’t have to work as hard to break down and process the nutrients that you are taking in. A good goal for a window of time to eat meals would be 20-30 minutes. If setting aside a half hour for a meal feels like an eternity, set a timer for 15 minutes and see if you can gradually eat a little bit slower each week.
  3. Taste your food
    • Start making mental notes about what your food actually tastes like and how you are experiencing it. Is the texture soft, chewy, crunchy, tough? How does your food taste? Sweet, savoury, salty, sour, bitter? How does your food smell? How do you physically feel while eating your food? Do you enjoy it? How could you improve it? How do you feel mentally while eating your food? Is it satisfying? These are all important things to pay attention while eating. And will allow you to truly experience your food and enjoy it significantly more.

 

So there you have it, eat what you want, but do it slowly, and savour the moment. 😉

Be like Erykah Badu, and put your phone down.

 

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Ditch Your Food Scales: The Hand Guide for a Balanced Diet

Lifestyle, Nutrition By February 23, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , No Comments

Can you recite the caloric value and macronutrient content of canned tuna, chicken, cucumber, tomatoes, apples, and peanut butter like it’s your job? Have you ever had a panic attack while trying to weigh your food to make sure you ate x amount kCals per day?

While tracking caloric and macronutrient intake can be useful over short periods of times – when done for extended periods of time it can warp your psyche. Especially if you lean towards the Type A perfectionist side of things (many of us do, myself included.) While results from adhering to an extremely strict dietary protocol can feel rewarding, it’s the same strict protocols that limit us in our ability to makes choices that serve us better overall and exercise our personal power.

There is a loss of power and choice when you follow a restrictive diet and don’t get to be proactive in choosing what and when you eat based off of your hunger, satiety, and needs. As a living organism with daily fluctuations in energy use and needs and no amount of macronutrient or calorie tracking is going to be able adapt to that.

Luckily we have a built in system in our body that takes care of these daily fluctuations of by regulating our appetite and satiety – and the more you pay attention to these signals the easier it gets. But to get good at listening to your body’s signal that also means you have:

  1. Stop neglecting hunger; no dieting or excessive restricion of food intakes
  2. Stop neglecting satiety; eating slowly untill you are satisfied but not ready to burst

You can be strong, healthy, thriving and sane without having the additional stress of counting calories or macronutrients. Your eating strategies need to work for you – not the other way around. You are not bound my chains to your food scale or your diet. Gone are the days of trying to figure out how many Oreos you can eat so you don’t blow your diet. If you’re ready to be free of obsessive food tracking, calorie counting, and restriction but don’t know where to start – read on.

If you’ve ever sat over your kitchen counter in front of scale with you a piece of paper, pen, calculator and tears in your eyes – this guide is for you. 


The Hand Guide for a Balanced Diet

The following guide will help outline what foods you should be adding in to your diet on a daily basis and what types of quantities. It is not a rigid restrictive guideline and is flexible system that is inclusive off mostly whole foods that will help you achieve a balanced diet so you can feel great, look great, and thrive. We’re going to to go over the food groups, meal structure, and portion sizes so you’ll be good to go using your most handy and convenient measuring tool – your hand. On ward to a simple, effective, and stress-free dietary system.

Food Groups 

Protein dense foods

Provides us with amino acids to help maintain and rebuild tissues in the body.

Chicken, beef, eggs, turkey, salmon, tuna, Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, protein powders, etc.

Vegetables & Fruits (Fibrous foods)

Provides us with fibre for optimal digestive health as well as being a significant source or micronutrients needed for various chemical processes in the body.

Spinach, peppers, apples, bananas, carrots, cauliflower, broccoli, tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini, squash, berries, etc.

Carbohydrate dense foods

Provides us with a direct source of energy for brain function and physical activity.

Rice, quinoa, couscous, oats, noodles, breads, etc.

Fat dense foods

Important for maintaing cellular health and strucutre as well as synthetiszing hormones in the body.

Olive oil, butter,  coconut oil, avocado, cream, nuts, nut butters, seeds, dressings, etc.

Meal Structure

In terms of structuring your meals you want to aim to have a balanced plate each time you eat – this means including good sources of protein, fibre, carbohydrate, and fats at each meal. This means adding 1-2 servings of each food category to each meal, this structure is based off of eating 3 – 4 meals per day.

Depending on your size and activity level you may need more food than what is suggested, start with the guideline as a basis and as you get more comfortable feel free to add as you need to based off your levels of hunger and satiety.

  Female Male
Protein Dense Foods 1 serving per meal 2 servings per meal
Vegetables & Fruits (Fibrous foods) 1 serving per meal 2 servings per meal
Carbohydrate dense foods 1 serving per meal 2 servings per meal
Fat dense foods 1 serving per meal 2 servings per meal

Portions

Last but not least we’re finally at the part where you can throw out your food scale and measuring cup. Your new measuring tool is your lovely hand. The great thing about your hand is that you always have it and can bring it anywhere you go. Secondly, it’s already proportionate to you – meaning if you’re a big person, you have a bigger hand or if you’re a smaller person, you have a smaller hand. It’s hard to go wrong 😉

 

Serving Size

Protein Dense Foods

The size of your palm

Vegetables & Fruits (Fibrous foods)

The size of your fist

Carbohydrate dense foods

The size of a cupped hand

Fat dense foods

The size of your thumb

 

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Refer to this super high tech visual guide.


I know what you’re probably thinking: “That’s all?!” like 90% of the people I’ve ever taught this system.

To which I answer: Yes, that is all. I want you to eat your proteins, your vegetables, your carbs, and your fats. I want you to feel and look great. I want you to have as little stress as possible when it comes to having a healthy balanced diet filled with foods that you love. And most importantly I want you to enjoy the process of eating well and I want you to enjoy the food.

By keeping it simple with this guide, you’re well on your way to feeling great and living your healthiest life both physically and mentally. And if you really want an Oreo at the end of the day after you’ve nourished your body with all these awesome foods – go for it 😉

Are you ready to use the Hand Guide? Are you already using the Hand Guide?

Did this article blow your mind? I want to hear from you.

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Welcome to The “Anti-Diet”

Fat Loss, Mindset, Nutrition By August 23, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , No Comments

Have you tried every diet known to mankind?

You’ve done keto, paleo, Whole30, Atkins, South Beach, Weight Watchers, IIFYM, etc. But still find yourself in a never ending cycle of food restriction and bingeing and weight cycling.

You have 10 pairs of jeans in 10 different sizes to accomodate your weight fluctuations/shape fluctuations. People will see you once and not be able to recognize you three months later because of how different you look. Not only do you change physically, but mentally you’re always between the highs and lows of “succeeding” and “failing” to change and maintain your body.

I’m here to tell you don’t have to do this. You don’t have to suffer anymore. You can have a body that love without punishing it, you can enjoy the foods you love without feeling guilty. You don’t have to be “on/off plan”, you can just be.

I understand it can be scary to let go of all the conventional wisdom you know about weight loss and changing your body. But how useful and healthy are conventional protocols if you cannot maintain or adhere to them consistently? 

The reality is that restrictive dieting is not healthy. Any diet where you overly restrict caloric intake, restrict macronutrient intake (ie. eliminating carbs, fats, protein), or obsessively dichotomize food into “good” or “bad” can be devastating to you physically or mentally.

Yo-Yo Dieting is more harmful than it is good and is highly correlated with the following:

  • Loss of lean body mass
  • Slowed metabolism
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Heart Disease
  • Bradychardia (slowed heart rate)
  • Obesity
  • Developtment of Eating Disorders
  • Depression/Anxiety

In addition to this list, 95% of dieters usually regain their lost weight within 1-5 years or dieting. So why suffer for a fleeting “success?” Personally, I’m not satisfied with results that don’t last. I’m not satisfied with being restricted. I’m not satisfied with day to day suffering. And I don’t think you should be either.

If you’re tired of yo-yo dieting and gaining and losing the same 10, 20, 30, 50 lbs over and over again – it’s time to embrace The Anti-Diet.

The Anti-Diet is exaclty what you think it is. Not a diet. It’s a philosophy that helps foster healthy relationships with food, with our bodies, and allows up to optimize our physical and mental health.

The Anti-Diet is a way of eating day to day that is free of restriction. It is sustainable, effective and easy to adhere to. The Anti Diet is also known as Attuned Eating or Intuitive Eating. People who adhere to the philosophy of intuitive eating tend to have lower body weight and a greater overall sense of well-being than those who adhere to conventional dieting.

If you’re ready to be done with diets and become an Anti-Dieter or Attuned Eater…look no farther.

The Principles of The Anti-Diet

  1. Eat when you are hungry. Listen to your body’s cues. We were created to thrive and our body’s signals tell us when we need energy and when we do not. If your body is sending you hunger signals it is time to eat – if your body is not giving off hunger signals, it is not time to eat. If we delay eating despite being hungry we can lose our ability to moderate our food intake and will naturally want to overeat and make less conscientious food choices.
  2. Stop eating when you are satisfied. Closely tied into eating when you are hungry you also need to listen to your body for the signals that it is satisfied. Ideally you want to minize experiences or being painfully hungry or painfully full. Listen to your body’s signals to regulate your energy intake, you don’t need to count calories. You just need to be mindful of what you are feeling physically.hunger scale
  3. Enjoy the foods that you eat. Eating foods you enjoy brings you satisfaction. If you hate brocolli there’s not point eating 5lbs of it just because someone told you to. Explore different foods and flavours. Eat foods that satifsfy your taste buds and your cravings. When you eat intuitevly you generally won’t experience intense cravings and you won’t feel the need to binge on your favourite foods because you are always allowed to have them (which will generally make you want them less becausey they are not “off limits.”)
  4. Reject restriction and convenitonal dieting. Reject caloric restriction, reject macronutrient restriction, reject dichotimizing food into “good/bad” and “clean/dirty.” Restrictive eating promotes disordered patterns and food phobias. You are free to eat whatever you want as long as you enjoy it and it makes you feel good physically.
  5. Respect your body. Learn to appreciate your body for what it is. It’s hard to accept and embrace listening to our bodies when all we can focus on is changing them. When we can’t actively respect or enjoy our bodies it’s hard to treat them properly and healthfully. anti-diet - good body image
  6. Do physical activity and exercise you enjoy. Stop punishing yourself by doing exercise to “burn calories.” Engage in exercise because you feel good when you do it. Your workouts and physical activity should leave you feeling happy, energized and more confident. Do types of exercises you genuinely enjoy and I guarantee you will never miss a workout – you’ll build a routine that serves you and allows to exercise lifelong healthy habits.

If you’re ready to stop dieting – it is never to late to start the Anti-Diet. Habit change takes time but there’s no reason why you can’t feel great mentally and look great physically by implementing the princples of the Anti-Diet in your day to day to life. Sometimes even just being more mindful of your eating will make a big difference alone. You can let go of restriction and get ready for healthier relationships with your body and with your food.

diet


 Check out this TED Talk from 2014 on dieting and the consequences of it that most people experience.

Do you need help implementing habit change in your life? Are you ready to stop dieting and start feeling amazing every day? I offer in person and online coaching for exercise and nutrition and we can get you started on the right track today.

 

Did you find this helpful? Do you have any questions or feedback? 

Leave your thoughts in the comment section or feel free to contact me by e-mail. 

🙂

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Do you want something for nothing?

Mindset, Training By June 28, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , No Comments

I wish I had a dollar for every time I heard someone tell me “I want to lose 10lbs.”

Not that this is a bad thing to want. But I’d rather hear someone say “I want to start going to the gym because I want to lose 10lbs.” Do you understand the difference? The first is an outcome, the latter is an action…and you can’t have an outcome without an action.

We live in a culture that is obsessed with outcomes but consistently neglects the fact that outcomes occur as a result of work.

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As a result of this mindset, we turn into people who want something for nothing and fall into traps of self-defeat because we haven’t achieved what we wanted despite not having taking steps to achieve what we want.

How logical is that? It isn’t logical at all because you can never have results without taking action.

You need to shift from focusing on “what you want” to focusing on “what you can do” – and by doing this you are guaranteeing yourself results. You are creating a process, whether this is for your personal fitness, your career, your relationships, etc. Processes are the pathways to success.

Hearing someone say “I want to lose 10lbs” means nothing to me. Hearing someone say “I want to go to the gym five days per week, drink 3L of water a day and, and eat vegetables at every meal” is much more tangible and valid. It creates a sense of urgency and priority.

When we neglect to prioritize our process – we doom ourselves. Having priorities is how you get stuff done – and if you have no priorities than you should reasonably expect nothing in return. Every single day we can choose to be engaged in something that will bring us closer to where we want to be. Your priorities and your actions are a reflection of your values and your true desires. And you need to own your actions.

By owning your actions, you remove yourself from being a victim and you give yourself power. You don’t feel like a failure if you aren’t seeing results. You go back, change the plan, and keep trying because you are in control of how you feel and what you do. You understand that you are the only person who can take the necessary action to keep moving forward. You own your process. And when you own your process that is when you succeed.

“Action expresses priorities.” – Mahatma Ghandi

What steps are you taking today to get what you want?

 

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The Thirst is Real – 3 Reasons Dehydration is Slowing You Down

Fat Loss, Nutrition, Training By May 26, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , No Comments

The thirst is real my friends. Dehydration levels are off the charts.

Day after day, working with client after client, I can’t stress enough how important it is to hydrate adequately. I would say 90% of people I work with do not drink enough of water on a daily basis. The average person needs about 0.6oz (18mL) of water  per pound of bodyweight per day without factoring in physical activity and compensating for diuretics like coffee, tea and alcohol.

For a person weighing 175lbs that means you need to consume 105oz of water or 3.1 Litres.

Now you may not think this is a big deal – but dehydration can signicantly hamper your results in the gym whether your training to get lean or wanting to post up with some new PRs.

water meme

Fat Loss

Proper hydration is the first issue I address with any of my clients who are looking to lose weight.  Water places a highly important role in metabolizing. Without sufficient water intake you can actually reduce the rate at which you lose fat. On top of that, when in a state of dehydration your body will often mistake thirst for hunger and will cause you to eat despite not actually being hungry.

Your overall water intake will also affect the overall health and efficacy of your digestive system.

Performance

If you’re an athlete training for performance or even competing it’s also important to understand that dehydration can affect you. Being under hydrated leads to decreased blood volume, decreased circulation, decreased sweating, increased core temperature and and overall decreased cooling rate of body temperature…meaning it will be a lot harder for you to perform as an athlete.

It’s also not uncommon to experience muscle fatigue, cramping, and decrease strength while being in a dehydrated state. As muscles cannot contract as strongly or efficiently when you are dehydrated this will add to an even larger decrease in performance.

However, before you start crushing intraworkout Gatorades – I suggest you look at your overall water consumption throughout the day. That’s generally where most people drop the ball and can improve quite quickly.

Trust me, you can perform just fine without chugging down the 32 grams of sugar in a Gatorade.

Trust me, you can perform just fine without chugging down the 32 grams of sugar in a Gatorade.

Energy

Hydration also plays a key role in energy and cognitive function. Most people who are dehydrated will feel “foggy” mentally, lethargic, and be unable to concentrate properly. As you can see this also very important outside of the gym as most people have jobs that require them be functioning and fulfilling specific task that require some degree of critical thinking.

It isn’t appropriate to be showing up for work, training, and life in general in a state of fatigue where you can’t function properly.

Hydration is Fun

So you want to get leaner, you want to perform at a higher level, and you want to feel better overall and you now understand how important hydration is for that…but you’re wondering how to successfully implement it. What works well for many is setting a behavioral goal.

Visually seeing how much water you are or aren’t taking in each day can be quite impacting. I recommend having three (or more) water bottles or shakers cups (one for home, one for work, and one to keep on you in between) filled with your suggested water intake – and drinking those throughout the day.

Having them ready to go gives you little room for failure in terms of your meeting hydration needs. It’s very straightforward – so if you’re water intake needs to be 3L per day, have three 1L containers filled and ready to go – if you spread them out and drank them throughout the day, you’re doing great. If you didn’t finish them as planned – dump the extra water and start again tomorrow.

PRO-TIP: It’s important to not compensate for lack of water consumption throughout the day by chugging down a bunch all at once – as the water will bypass everything and go straight to your bladder for excretion – which defeats the purpose of drinking water to hydrate your body.

Did you find this helpful? Do you have any questions or feedback?

Leave your thoughts in the comment section or feel free to contact me by e-mail.

 

 

 

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The Missing Link In Your Nutrition

Fat Loss, Nutrition, Recomp By May 3, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , No Comments

If you’re trying to change your physique and not seeing the results you want you may be neglecting an important factor in your diet.

No, I’m not referring to counting your calories, or weighing out all of your food, and planning all of your meals five months in advance.

I’m talking about satiety.

What is satiety? For the sake of simplicity and context let me explain it like this: Satiety means to eat until you are satisfied 1) physically and 2) mentally. 

Don't strive to feel like this guy.

Don’t strive to feel like this guy.


Physical satiety
is to eat until you are “full,” leaving you neither stuffed nor hungry. It’s a sweet spot where you feel good and well-nourished without feeling like your pants are about explode. People will neglect physical satiety by overeating or under eating. From time to time it is normal normal to go either way…but if repeated extensively you will eventually lose the ability to know when you are hungry and satisfied from your meals – which is less than ideal if trying to maintain or achieve change with your physique.

Mental satiety is to eat foods that satisfy your emotional and social needs (as much as we would like to detach from food being an emotional and social thing – that’s not going to happen.) You know and I know that showing up to family barbecue with a bag of carrot sticks to eat isn’t going to cut it when everyone else is throwing down bacon cheeseburgers. And that’s perfectly okay, you can give yourself permission to enjoy life and indulge in foods if they are worth it to you. When you give yourself permission to enjoy your food you prevent putting yourself into a mindset of “deprivation eating” which usually results in cycles of binge eating and severe restriction, and wreaks havoc on your body and your psyche.

ecard

When you eat to be satisfied and well-nourished, you allow your body to function optimally – meaning you can kill it in the gym and still have the energy to go about your daily life with vigor and enthusiasm. You can also change the composition of your body without dropping or gaining extreme amounts of weight (“recomping.”) You can also perform at a high level – getting stronger, fitter, and faster.

It’s hard to go wrong with something when it allows you to thrive physically and emotionally. So how do you implement this type of eating into your routine? No strict diet required…It’s quite moderate:

  • Eat till your hunger goes away but you don’t feel overfull
  • Eat at regular times
  • Eat foods that meet your requirements for protein, carbohydrates, fats, fiber, and other micro-nutrients
  • Eat foods that taste good to you
  • Indulge in “play” foods occasionally
  • Drink adequate amounts of water

Listening to satiety and hunger is the easiest and most moderate approach you can use for long-term maintenance of healthy bodyweight – but it’s often overlooked because it’s not “extreme” or “sexy” or “the latest thing.” However, it works and it’s the easiest thing to implement for an entire life time. Don’t be afraid of being moderate in your approach to eating and training – moderation offers sustainability.

Nobody wants to spend their life exercising 15 hours a week to the point of exhaustion while starving themselves on unseasoned fish and broccoli – only to eat an entire strawberry cheesecake in one sitting on Saturday and repeat the same cycle week after week. Your nutrition needs to work for you, not the other way around.

Rarely is extremism sustainable.

“Throw moderation to the winds, and the greatest pleasures bring the greatest pains.” – Democritus

 

 

 

 

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